New Year, New Beginnings

I am a little late on the whole new year, new you deal. So, a happy belated New Years to my short list of readers. It has been a busy past couple of months with work and school, and honestly not really wanting to write any blog posts because I was down in the dumps. Thanksgiving came and went, and then December arrived and it hit me that I was supposed to be leaving to head to Fiji. Actually, I would be there at this very moment. Yes, I am still a little bitter about the vents that occurred, even though you can’t control mother nature.

Honestly, it was a blessing in disguise. As most of you know I have rheumatoid arthritis. It is not something I talk a lot about on the web because I do not like to complain about it. It is a pain though, and for a while I was in remission, but as of August not anymore. I have gone through three rounds of infusions and finally after this last one it is helping. I have my next one in a few weeks and have started to notice the pain coming back. Cold weather also makes it worse. See, complaining.

I have also come to the realization that Nashville doesn’t  feel like home anymore. It feels like a stepping stone to wherever I end up next. Who knows where that will be, currently I am thinking out west. That could change next month, and it probably will. Because of the weird emotions I have been having I up and decided to delete Facebook this past Sunday, along with Tinder and OK Cupid. New year, new beginnings as I said.

There were some great times though. My family spent Thanksgiving and Christmas together for the first time in two years. My brother could not be here this year since he is doing the grown up internship year of his residency program. Family is amazing. Friends are amazing and when the blues hit you, they are what keeps you going, well for me at least.

I rang in the New Year with my best friend, Amber at the Old Crow Medicine Show Concert. Duh.

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We have also enjoyed going to Predators games and planning our spring break! Hooray for being a student!

Speaking of hockey games, I also got to see one of my great friends who no longer lives here, the one and only Josh.

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The spring semester started today and I am taking a full load of classes and working. I am still working on my 101 in 1001 list as well, along with wanting to travel and get outside more.

Things might be changing around the blog, but please do not leave me. I feel that I am discovering the person I want to be. Things could get interesting.

Unti next time.

Winter Blues

It’s not even technically winter here in Nashville, but it sure feels like it. I lost my toughness for cold weather. Savannah and San Diego spoiled me big time. Needless to say, I am struggling. I broke out my bean boots, puffy jacket, gloves and winter hat today just to drive 10 minutes to work and walk into my job. I do not care if I looked ridiculous, I was cold! I am still cold and it is going to be a long, very long winter for me. So in the words of Jimmy Buffett, “I gotta go where its warm!”

Now a list of warm songs by the master parrothead himself.

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Holiday
“The weather channel girl
with her perfect weather curl
is talking cold, cold, cold
You can’t get out of bed
you can’t remember what you’ve said
you’re feeling old, old, old”

My Lovely Lady
“Well, we’re sailing in those warm December breezes
Sendin’ picture post cards back to Tennessee.”

Migration
“Yeah, I got a Caribbean soul I can barely control
and some Texas (or Tennessee) hidden here in my heart.”

Changes in Latitudes, Changes in Atitudes
“And so many nights I just dream of the ocean.
God, I wish I was sailin’ again.”

Banana Republics
“Down to the Banana Republics
Down to the tropical sun
Go the expatriated American
Hopin’ to find some fun”

“I know I should be leaving this climate.
I got a verse but can’t rhyme it.
I gotta go where it’s warm.”

My knees are seriously shivering.

1001 in 101: More Items Completed

Creative juices are not flowing, so that means another update to my 1001 in 101 list!

 3. Go on an adventure, big or small, every month (Completed September 2013)
I was going to try to make this all the time, but decided to change it. I had some great adventures before moving back to Nashville, and I am sure they will continue. I just honestly cannot keep track.

11. Start rock climbing again
Completed October 2013. Having rheumatoid arthritis in the hands does not make climbing very easy. At least I gave it a shot!

26. Go kayaking at least once a month, weather permitting (July 2013)
I am ending this one as well. Kayaking is just not as easy in the cold weather back in Nashville!

33. Go to state I have never been to (September 2013 – Kansas)
This was on part of my Adventure Across America Series

Kansas is flatter than a pancake

Kansas is flatter than a pancake

45. Write down my thoughts more (November 2013)
Hey, I like it.

That’s it for now!

Four Score and Seven Years Ago.

Today marks the 150th anniversary of the Gettysburg Address. Instead of recapping what happened I wanted to share his speech and leave it at that. Then I decided to talk share the five different versions of the speech because why not?

The rest of the post comes from the Abraham Lincoln website.

“There are five known copies of the speech in Lincoln’s handwriting, each with a slightly different text, and named for the people who first received them: Nicolay, Hay, Everett, Bancroft and Bliss. Two copies apparently were written before delivering the speech; the remaining ones were produced months later for soldier benefit events. Despite widely-circulated stories to the contrary, the president did not dash off a copy aboard a train to Gettysburg. Lincoln carefully prepared his major speeches in advance; his steady, even script in every manuscript is consistent with a firm writing surface, not the notoriously bumpy Civil War-era trains. Additional versions of the speech appeared in newspapers of the era, feeding modern-day confusion about the authoritative text.”

Bliss Copy
This version is the most reproduced copy of the speech. It is also the one on the walls of the Lincoln Memorial. Lincoln wrote the speech on both sides of the paper, so it could not be duplicated. It is the last known written copy, and the only one signed and dated by him. It is on display in the Lincoln Room of the White House.

Four score and seven years ago our fathers brought forth on this continent, a new nation, conceived in Liberty, and dedicated to the proposition that all men are created equal.

Now we are engaged in a great civil war, testing whether that nation, or any nation so conceived and so dedicated, can long endure. We are met on a great battle-field of that war. We have come to dedicate a portion of that field, as a final resting place for those who here gave their lives that that nation might live. It is altogether fitting and proper that we should do this.

But, in a larger sense, we can not dedicate — we can not consecrate — we can not hallow — this ground. The brave men, living and dead, who struggled here, have consecrated it, far above our poor power to add or detract. The world will little note, nor long remember what we say here, but it can never forget what they did here. It is for us the living, rather, to be dedicated here to the unfinished work which they who fought here have thus far so nobly advanced. It is rather for us to be here dedicated to the great task remaining before us — that from these honored dead we take increased devotion to that cause for which they gave the last full measure of devotion — that we here highly resolve that these dead shall not have died in vain — that this nation, under God, shall have a new birth of freedom — and that government of the people, by the people, for the people, shall not perish from the earth.

Abraham Lincoln
November 19, 1863

Nicolay Copy
Named for Lincoln’s personal secretary, this is to be considered the “first draft” of the speech. The Library of Congress owns this speech.

Four score and seven years ago our fathers brought forth, upon this continent, a new nation, conceived in liberty, and dedicated to the proposition that “all men are created equal.”

Now we are engaged in a great civil war, testing whether that nation, or any nation so conceived, and so dedicated, can long endure. We are met on a great battle field of that war. We come to dedicate a portion of it, as a final resting place for those who died here, that the nation might live. This we may, in all propriety do.

But, in a larger sense, we can not dedicate – we can not consecrate – we can not hallow, this ground – The brave men, living and dead, who struggled here, have hallowed it, far above our poor power to add or detract. The world will little note, nor long remember what we say here; while it can never forget what they did here.

It is rather for us, the living, we here be dedicated to the great task remaining before us – that, from these honored dead we take increased devotion to that cause for which they here, gave the last full measure of devotion – that we here highly resolve these dead shall not have died in vain; that the nation, shall have a new birth of freedom, and that government of the people, by the people, for the people, shall not perish from the earth.

 Hay Copy
This is believed to be the second draft of the speech. Lincoln gave this speech to John Hay, a White House assistant. This copy includes handwritten changes and is also owned by the Library of Congress.

Four score and seven years ago our fathers brought forth, upon this continent, a new nation, conceived in Liberty, and dedicated to the proposition that all men are created equal.

Now we are engaged in a great civil war, testing whether that nation, or any nation so conceived, and so dedicated, can long endure. We are met here on a great battlefield of that war. We have come to dedicate a portion of it, as a final resting place for those who here gave their lives that that nation might live. It is altogether fitting and proper that we should do this.

But in a larger sense, we can not dedicate — we can not consecrate — we can not hallow — this ground. The brave men, living and dead, who struggled here, have consecrated it far above our poor power to add or detract. The world will little note, nor long remember, what we say here, but can never forget what they did here.

It is for us, the living, rather to be dedicated here to the unfinished work which they have, thus far, so nobly carried on. It is rather for us to be here dedicated to the great task remaining before us — that from these honored dead we take increased devotion to that cause for which they gave the last full measure of devotion – that we here highly resolve that these dead shall not have died in vain; that this nation shall have a new birth of freedom; and that this government of the people, by the people, for the people, shall not perish from the earth.

Everett Copy
Edward Everett, was the chief speaker at the Gettysburg cemetery dedication. In 1864, he asked Lincoln for a copy of the speech to give to Union soldiers, making it the third manuscript copy. The state of Illinois acquired it, where it is preserved at the Abraham Lincoln Presidential Library and Museum.

Four score and seven years ago our fathers brought forth, upon this continent, a new nation, conceived in Liberty, and dedicated to the proposition that all men are created equal.

Now we are engaged in a great civil war, testing whether that nation, or any nation so conceived, and so dedicated, can long endure. We are met on a great battle-field of that war. We have come to dedicate a portion of that field, as a final resting-place for those who here gave their lives, that that nation might live. It is altogether fitting and proper that we should do this.

But, in a larger sense, we can not dedicate, we can not consecrate – we can not hallow – this ground. The brave men, living and dead, who struggled here, have consecrated it far above our poor power to add or detract. The world will little note, nor long remember what we say here, but it can never forget what they did here.

It is for us, the living, rather, to be dedicated here to the unfinished work which they who fought here, have, thus far, so nobly advanced. It is rather for us to be here dedicated to the great task remaining before us – that from these honored dead we take increased devotion to that cause for which they here gave the last full measure of devotion – that we here highly resolve that these dead shall not have died in vain – that this nation, under God, shall have a new birth of freedom – and that government of the people, by the people, for the people, shall not perish from the earth.

Bancroft Copy
Historian George Bancroft asked Lincoln for a copy to benefit Union Soldiers. When Lincoln sent his copy, he used both sides of the paper making the manuscript useless for lithographic engraving. Bancroft kept his copy and Lincoln had to produce another one (Bliss Copy). The Bancroft Copy is now owned by Cornell University.

Four score and seven years ago our fathers brought forth, on this continent, a new nation, conceived in Liberty, and dedicated to the proposition that all men are created equal.

Now we are engaged in a great civil war, testing whether that nation, or any nation so conceived, and so dedicated, can long endure. We are met on a great battle-field of that war. We have come to dedicate a portion of that field, as a final resting-place for those who here gave their lives, that that nation might live. It is altogether fitting and proper that we should do this.

But, in a larger sense, we can not dedicate, we can not consecrate – we can not hallow – this ground. The brave men, living and dead, who struggled here, have consecrated it far above our poor power to add or detract. The world will little note, nor long remember what we say here, but it can never forget what they did here. It is for us the living, rather, to be dedicated here to the unfinished work which they who fought here have thus far so nobly advanced. It is rather for us to be here dedicated to the great task remaining before us – that from these honored dead we take increased devotion to that cause for which they here gave the last full measure of devotion – that we here highly resolve that these dead shall not have died in vain – that this nation, under God, shall have a new birth of freedom, and that government of the people, by the people, for the people, shall not perish from the earth.

In the words of Robert E. Lee

“The march of Providence is so slow and our desires so impatient; the work of progress so immense andour means of aiding it so feeble; the life of humanity is so long, that of the individual so brief, that we often see only the ebb of the advancing wave and are thus discouraged. It is history that teaches us to hope.”

Being 25

My 25th year of life is not exactly what I thought it would be. I am not saying that is is bad, but if you were to ask me in June what it could be like, well it would be different. It’s that word, plan, that little word that changes so much. If my plans had not changed, I would have just moved home from San Diego for holidays and started to prepare for my six month adventure to Fiji come January. However, I have been home for two months now and am back in grad school for a second time. I am working a part time job. I am no longer going to Fiji due to mother nature and I have not gone scuba diving since the end of July.

Being 25 I have seen countless posts of engagements and wedding announcements on social media. Heck, even babies have been born from people who are 25, older or younger than me. I have no boyfriend because perhaps I am too picky or just have been looking for love in all the wrong places, but I am single. There was a time in my life, say six months ago where I did not want a boyfriend because I was going to be living halfway across the world for six months. At the age of 25 I feel as it is okay for me to admit that I would enjoy being in a relationship. It gets old being the single one all time, and having your parents talking about playing matchmaker, no offense Dad. As much as I do get my feathers ruffled and wonder why I am still single, I am happy I am. I could not imagine being married right now. The last few relationships ended for a reason. It would be a miserable marriage. I still want to explore and do fun things on my own.

It is perfectly okay to want to stay at home at 9pm on a Friday or Saturday and have a West Wing marathon on Netflix. Really, any TV show that makes a night at home alone go fast by yourself. Sometimes a beer or a glass of wine might even be involved. Better yet, have some girlfriends over and swoon over Rob Lowe or Josh Lyman. It is perfectly acceptable.

Travel. Take that trip to Europe. Work on a sailboat (still trying to accomplish this). Work as a raft guide. Do something fun before going back to school or while you are trying to find yourself. When my brother was my age he spent six months hiking the Appalachian Trail. Move away from your home state, and not just for college. I moved to Savannah, GA for graduate school as many of you are aware. Although the program did not work out in the way I though it would, it opened my eyes. Moving to San Diego did the same thing. Am I still sad to be back? Yes and no. There are times where I want to be living someplace else, but I know that at this moment I am supposed to be here, in Nashville.

Being 25 is amazing. It can also be sad and frustrating when you are trying to find a date to a weddings so you’re not the single person there. Have fun figuring out your life, I know I am. Take it in strides. Plan trips with your close friends, and it is okay to have three friends that you can always count on compared to ten that are who knows where.

Most importantly, be yourself. It will fall into place. Life will happen. Do not rush it.

Another Night at the Opry

Starting in November, the Grand Ole Opry moves to the mother church of country music, the Ryman. I once again attended a showing there on Friday night with my Dad and friends. You might know who was playing; Old Crow Medicine Show! Surprise, surprise. There were other performers, but there was a special guest by the name of Winston Marshall, a member of Mumford and Sons. Yup! He has been in town for a while and you can catch him on Lightning 100 tonight, well it might be over now.

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I am just a little excited.

Until next time, Old Crow, and maybe Winston.

Recently

It has been a little busy here in the real world of my life. Blog land has been neglected once again, and I am very sorry for my loyal readers out there. School has been in full swing. A term ended and B term started. I just love group projects in online classes! Work has been keeping me busy, and I am really enjoying it, minus dealing with some very unruly children. Winter arrived today. I am not a huge fan of the cold, mostly because it makes my arthritis hurt even worse. Speaking of that, I had my second infusion treatment done yesterday. I am no longer in remission and the lovely disease is back with a vengeance. Since this is not much of a entertaining post, I have done some shopping and acquired things from the parents, so I will share that with you.

Screen Shot 2013-11-12 at 10.24.33 PMJ.Crew Tippi Sweater (UK Blue)

Screen Shot 2013-11-12 at 10.27.31 PMJ.Crew Elbow Patch Sweater

Screen Shot 2013-11-12 at 10.32.51 PMI am loving this J.Crew Factory Fair Isle sweater

Screen Shot 2013-11-12 at 10.34.56 PMJ.Crew Factory Color Block Elbow Patch (notice the trend)

Screen Shot 2013-11-12 at 10.37.57 PMJ.Crew Men’s Flannel

Screen Shot 2013-11-12 at 10.41.25 PMBarbour Bedale Jacket (Finally!)

Look out for the Christmas wish list soon!